Solar power in California. Photo by: CCTV America / YouTube
Solar power in California. Photo by: CCTV America / YouTube

Solar Power In 2016

Solar power is one of the most common sources for renewable energy. In 2016, we take a current look at the jobs being added to the solar power industry, the kilowatts and gigawatts being produced, and how different states and countries are transitioning to clean, renewable energy.

In an era of increased carbon emissions, the progressive minds of the world continue to work together to help reduce the damaging effects being caused by climate change.

In an article from The Guardian, they report that: the US solar industry expects to install 14.5 gigawatts of solar power in 2016, a 94% increase over the record 7.5 gigawatts last year, according to a new market report by GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association.

“I think it will actually be bigger than people are projecting,” says Jigar Shah, president and co-founder of Generate Capital, a clean energy investment firm based in San Francisco. “The solar industry is booming right now.”

California is more well known for producing solar power than other sections of the world due to the large amount of land and sun available.

In comparison, Ireland is more known for their use of wind power, but with recent developments in the technology of the grids, it appears Ireland is starting to make a move for additional solar power. In an article from the Irish Times, they report that solar power could create up to 7,300 jobs while meeting 7 per cent of electricity demand.

In Germany, they currently generate 7 percent of its power from solar. A recent report by the U.S Energy Information Administration, notes that in 2014, California produced 5 percent of its annual utility-scale electricity generation from utility-scale solar power.

As developed countries around the world make the transition to solar power, it helps developing countries as well with decreasing the amount of carbon emissions, and providing the blueprint to a successful renewable future.


California’s Solar Power Gold Rush