Woman coding for Hour of Code. Photo by: Pexels.com
Woman coding for Hour of Code. Photo by: Pexels.com

Hour of Code Taking Place Internationally December 5-11

Hour of Code is officially underway in countries around the globe. This initiative helps younger people learn new skills in computer coding.

The online platform provides one-hour tutorial designed for all ages in over 45 languages. Join millions of students and teachers in over 180 countries starting with an Hour of Code.

In reality, it is difficult to get young people excited about computer programming overall. They want to exercise and burn energy. This creates a barrier for young people that need to learn computer science skills.

Code.org and Khan Academy has started Hour of Code for people that need some motivation in acquiring new computer-based skills. Code.org started Hour of Code, but Khan Academy offers learning tutorials within the program.

When a user scans over the programs available to learn, one will see tutorials on how to create a basic game, coding, digital music, climate data and many more additional options. They tend to create narratives to fit a younger demographic.

Hour of Code works best when teachers and parents interact with the programs. I’ve been a teaching assistant for a Web production course at a local college. I have personally seen the level of improvement that takes place when people have a partner to bounce a complex idea off of to get feedback. Use this map to find local volunteers who can visit your classroom or join a video chat with your students.

Two programs that caught my attention the most as an adult was the html basic course, the python coding course, and the climate change data course.

Overall, teaching younger people the basics of html is a great way to introduce them to coding, but once you get a solid understanding of how to produce that language, javascript and css would be a good second step. After one has learned those skills, conquering and learning python would work well for additional learning.

Computer language is a lot like different spoken languages. People use both forms of communication to relate ideas, feelings and messages to one another. With more and more services and products being sold online, the ability to create and produce meaningful user interactions will continue to become even more vital.

Hour of Code does an excellent job of taking international athletes, and building awareness with their influence. I also find the athletes to be multidimensional. Their ability to crossover from a sporting arena to the classroom is a thought provoking idea.

Watch over a clip from Hour of Code 2016, and connect with them on social media for updates.

Hour of Code with Draymond Green